Photo Ken Green, May 14, 2018

Latest Deaccessioning Around the Country

The 2020 COVID global pandemic brought deacessioning to a new level caused by the extended lockdowns accross the country and the world.

The Met plans to use money from art sales to help it survive the pandemic. Critics say it’s a dangerous precedent.

By Peggy McGlone and Sebastian Smee, The Washington Post / March 8, 2021
The Metropolitan Museum of Art approved a policy last week that allows proceeds from the sale of works from its collection to be used for salaries and overhead costs associated with the collection’s care.

The Met seeks to thin its permanent collection to make ends meet

By Joan Altabe and Milos Kitanovic, Blasting News / February 24, 2021
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, complaining of poor gate receipts, is selling part of its permanent collection to pay operating costs

The Met Considers Selling Its Art To Stave Off Financial Shortfall

By Farah Eltohamy, NPR / February 22, 2021
The pandemic is causing The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to consider selling its artwork to cover operational costs as it falls short of $150 million in revenue.

‘This Is Something We Can Handle Professionally’: Met Director Max Hollein Defends His Controversial Deaccessioning Proposal

By Brian Boucher, artnet news / February 18, 2021
Many in the art industry are up in arms over the world’s richest museum possibly using funds from the sale of artworks to shore up revenue losses.

While the Met contemplates selling its treasured art, rich trustees sit idle

By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times / February 14, 2021
That was some bombshell that New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art dropped into the news cycle the other day.

Rumbles of dissent emerge over Met’s proposal to expand deaccessioning

By Nancy Kenney, The Art Newspaper / February 9, 2021
As museum mulls art sales to finance collections care, critics worry that its example could open the floodgates for US art institutions

A Former Met Director Says That If the Museum Starts Selling Art It’ll Become Like ‘Crack Cocaine to an Addict’ + Other Stories

artnet news / February 8, 2021

Facing Deficit, Met Considers Selling Art to Help Pay the Bills

By Robin Pogrebin, The New York Times / February 7, 2021
Like many museums, the Met is looking to take advantage of a relaxation of the rules governing art sales to care for collections.

Deaccessioning After 2020

Syracuse University / March 17–19, 2021
A virtual 2-day symposium that aims to comprehensively address collections and deaccessioning in the context of the economic fallout of the pandemic and the national call to rethink the role and responsibilities of museums and their collections in an increasingly diverse and complex world. The symposium’s agenda reflects a broad set of perspectives and taps experts from across the art and museum world, from directors and trustees, to seasoned museum professionals, scholars, legal experts, artists, auction houses, journalists, and influencers.

Following $12 M. Pollock Sale, Everson Museum Acquires Contemporary Works by Shinique Smith, Ellen Lesperance, More

By Angelica Villa, ArtNews / January 7, 2021
The Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, New York, has announced the acquisition of seven works by emerging and mid-career artists to its permanent collection, including works by well-known artists Shinique Smith and Ellen Lesperance, as well as pieces from local artists. The newly acquired works will be featured in the museum’s upcoming exhibition “Who What When Where” scheduled to open in March.

The Baltimore Museum Wants to Diversify Its Collection; It Should Be Allowed to

By Brian Frye, Hyperallergic / January 25, 2021
Let’s be honest. The primary reason the AAMD rules exist are to ensure that only private collectors can realize capital gains in the art market.

The Gray Market: Why the Art World Needs a Clear Marker for What the ‘End of the Pandemic’ Means (and Other Insights)

By Tim Schneider, artnet news / March 1, 2021
Our columnist explores US medical experts’ thinking on how to define when to lift public-health restrictions.

Why ‘Global Weirding’ Makes Art Museums Needier Than Ever for Unglamorous Donations (and Other Insights)

By Tim Schneider, artnet news / February 22, 2021
Our columnist connects a devastating winter storm in Texas, climate change, and a longstanding drought within cultural philanthropy.

Petition launches against the Met’s plan to sell art amidst $150M deficit

By Dana Schulz. 6sqft, February 22, 2021
Our columnist connects a devastating winter storm in Texas, climate change, and a longstanding drought within cultural philanthropy.

Resignation and Deaccession: Last Week’s News

By leadershipmatters1213, February 22, 2021
Two news threads sparked the museum world’s collective consciousness last week: One, Charles Venable’s resignation from the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and the second, the Metropolitan Museum’s announcement that it will take AAMD up on its COVID loophole, allowing art museums to put deaccession funds towards collections care as opposed to acquisitions.

Met director defends move to consider deaccessioning for collections care rather than art purchases

By Nancy Kenney, The Art Newspaper / February 17, 2021
Max Hollein argues that more art will not necessarily be sold, although proceeds can now go to other purposes amid the pandemic financial crisis

After renovations, how will the Berkshire Museum move forward?

By Hope Davis and Rosemary Starace, The Berkshire Eagle / February 12, 2021
The Berkshire Museum’s investment of $3.5 million in building renovation is good news, but did it require sacrificing the community’s most valuable art?

As Museums Push to Sell Art, Competing Ideas About Deaccessioning Are Playing Out in Public

By Andrew Russeth, Artnews / February 8, 2021
The Berkshire Museum’s investment of $3.5 million in building renovation is good news, but did it require sacrificing the community’s most valuable art?

‘Shameful and Misguided’: Former Met Staff and Others Say the Museum Would Set a Dangerous Precedent by Selling Art to Cover Costs

By Eileen Kinsella, artnet news / February 8, 2021
Despite relaxed official guidelines, critics had harsh words for the revered museum.

Berkshire Museum Renovates Building With Funds Raised From Art Sales

ArtFixdaily / January 31, 2021
Despite relaxed official guidelines, critics had harsh words for the revered museum.

San Francisco Art Institute chair steps down in wake of controversy over proposed Diego Rivera mural sale

By Wallace Ludel, The Art Newspaper / January 25, 2021
Pam Rorke Levy, who has led the school’s board since 2018, will be replaced by photographer and alum Lonnie Graham

ABOUT

SAVE THE ART (STA)
A grassroots citizens group established in 2017 with the intent of stopping the sale of the Berkshire Museum’s treasured art collection in order to find an alternate solution to its continued financial shortfall.

MISSION

The mission of Save the Art is to advocate for and protect the Public Trust — the art and objects belonging to all of us that document humankind’s creative and social history through time.

PRESS

We thank the Berkshire Eagle for their extensive investigative coverage, the journalists, op-ed writers and our community for their hundreds of letters of concern and applaud Larry Parnass / Investigations Editor for his 2018 Outstanding Journalism award. See The Berkshire Eagle page located in Press menu.